Connect with us

Business

13 million Nigerians face deteriorating food crisis – UN report

Published

on

  • Nigeria among six African nations with worst food insecurity

Nigeria may witness a serious deterioration in food security this year with about 13 million people falling into acute food insecurity during the season.

The 2021 Global Report on Food Crises stated this, whose latest findings also placed Nigeria among six countries in Africa with worse food crises.

The GRFC is prepared by 16 leading global and regional organisations belonging to the Global Network Against Food Crises.

It is released annually by the Food Security Information Network, led by the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation, the World Food Programme, and International Food Policy Research Institute.

The report listed other countries with worse food crises as Ethiopia, South Sudan, the Sudan, and Zimbabwe, Republic of the Congo.

According to report, the number of people around the world facing severe food insecurity skyrocketed by 20 million in 2020.

It stated that acute food insecurity had now affected at least 155 million people across 55 countries and territories, with some regions facing famine-level hunger.

In West Africa and the Sahel, the report said market disruptions, rising food prices, and falling incomes stemming from COVID-19 containment measures also contributed to increasing hunger in the region, as did severe flooding in some areas.

It highlighted the high severity and numbers of people in crisis or worse or equivalent in 55 countries and territories, driven by persistent conflict, pre-existing and COVID-19-related economic shocks, and weather extremes.

The number identified in the 2021 edition is the highest in the report’s five-year existence.

Auto

Photos: Coscharis rolls out new Land Rover Discovery Sport, Jaguar F-Pace

Published

on

 

Coscharis Motors on Wednesday unveiled the 2021 edition of the Land Rover Discovery Sport and Jaguar F-Pace at its Lekki-Epe Expressway head office, Lagos.
Detailed reports later…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue Reading

Business

CBN fixes N1m application fee for payment service firm

Published

on

Anyone intending to set up a payment service holding company will have to pay a mandatory application fee of N1m, the Central Bank of Nigeria has announced.
This, it said, was part of the guidelines for the establishment and regulation of payments service holding companies in Nigeria.
Musa Jimoh, CBN’s director of payments system management department, stated this in a circular.
The guidelines require companies that intend to offer both switching and processing, and mobile money services to set up a PSHC structure.
“This arrangement would prevent commingling of activities, facilitate management of risks and enable the Central Bank of Nigeria exercise adequate regulatory oversight on all the companies operating within the Group (PSHC),” the circular stated.
The CBN said promoters of a PSHC would be required to submit a formal application for the grant of a licence.
But it said the application process would be in two phases: approval-in-principle (AIP) and a final licence.
According to the guidelines, the capital requirement to apply for an AIP is “a non-refundable application fee of N1,000,000.00 (One Million Naira only) or such other amount that the CBN may specify from time to time; payable to the Central Bank of Nigeria, through electronic transfer.
“Not later than six (6) months after obtaining the AIP, the promoters of a proposed PSHC shall submit an application to the CBN for the grant of a final licence.
“The application shall be accompanied with non-refundable licensing fee of N5,000,000.00 (Five Million Naira only), or such other amount that the CBN may specify from time to time, payable to the Central Bank of Nigeria by electronic transfer.”
The apex bank explained that a PSHC would be set up for the purposes of making and managing equity investment in two or more companies being its subsidiaries, which are payments service providers across three categories: mobile money operations, switching and processing, and payment solution services.
It said, “PSHC shall be non-operating, existing solely to carry out investment in approved subsidiaries without engaging in the day-to-day management and operations of subsidiaries.
“It shall have a board size of between 5 and 10 or as determined by applicable CBN Corporate Governance Guidelines.”
The CBN added that no PSHC is allowed to borrow from the Nigerian banking system for the purpose of capitalising itself or any of its subsidiaries.

Continue Reading

Aviation

UAE lifts ban on transit flights from Nigeria, others

Published

on

The United Arab Emirates has announced the exclusion of some countries from which entry has been prohibited, including India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Nigeria and Uganda, as of August 5.
These categories of travellers named are those with valid residency permits who have received full vaccination doses in the UAE and 14 days have passed since receiving the second dose and who have vaccination certificates approved by the official authorities in the country.
Others are medical personnel working in the country will be excluded, including doctors, nurses, technicians from the vaccinated and non-vaccinated, and those working in the educational sector in the country who teach in universities, colleges, schools and institutes from the vaccinated and non-vaccinated categories.
Students studying in the country and humanitarian cases (vaccinated or not vaccinated) who hold valid residency, workers in federal and local government agencies, and cases of completing treatment in the country, whether they are catering or not, will be excluded.
All of these categories will be required to submit a request on the website of the Federal Authority for Identity and Citizenship to obtain the necessary approvals in addition to vaccination certificates certified by the concerned authorities in the country for the categories from which these certificates are required.
The excluded groups will be obligated to submit a prior (PCR) laboratory test within (48) hours from the date of departure, provided that the tests are from accredited laboratories, bear a QR Code, and conduct a quick laboratory test before boarding the plane.
In addition to applying precautionary and preventive measures to receive arrivals, including quarantine and PCR checks upon and after arrival, in addition to follow-up and health monitoring of arrivals.
Travel will resume for transit passengers from all countries from which transit passengers were previously suspended, provided that the traveler’s last destination is accepted and a laboratory examination is submitted within 72 hours from the time of departure, and the country’s airports will allocate special lounges for transit passengers.

Continue Reading

Trending